EDUindex News

EDUindex News

BATTERIES : A TOXIC THREAT ?

  It is now the second millennium and technology has advanced tremendously throughout the years. And continues to do so as well. New and improved products and gadgets need batteries to conduct its purpose. Company's such as Battery Solutions states that the demand for batteries in the U.S. is projected to increase 5.8% every year through 2002. Battery Solutions claim that in 1998 there were over three billion industrial and household batteries sold in the United States alone. This demand for batteries will continue, as long as technology advances. It is a known fact that batteries power much of the equipment we use everyday for work or play. Telephone, laptops, radios, cars, and scores of other devices are all made portable with batteries. But what do you do with a battery after it runs down, or a rechargeable battery won't recharge? Many consumer would simply toss them into the garbage, not knowing what harm battery waste can do. All used batteries are hazardous waste. So they should be recycled and disposed correctly.

             Batteries come in many shapes in sizes and several types. Batteries are identified in two different categories. The two types are primary batteries and secondary batteries. Primary batteries are batteries that have the same plate-active material as secondary types. However, these batteries are constructed so that only one continuous or intermittent discharge can be obtained. Types of primary batteries are alkaline, lithium, carbon-zinc, mercury, silver, and zinc batteries. Primary batteries are usually used for portable low-power appliances. Alkaline, Lithium, and carbon-zinc batteries are used for similar things such as radios, cameras, appliances, toys, and flashlights. Mercury, silver, and zinc batteries are used for smaller objects like hearing aids, pagers, calculators, and watches.